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What do we think about the FOTA breakaway series?
Good idea 44%  44%  [ 4 ]
Bad idea 56%  56%  [ 5 ]
Total votes : 9
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 1:58 pm 
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Quote:
FOTA teams to launch breakaway series

By Jonathan Noble Thursday, June 18th 2009, 22:43 GMT

The Formula One Teams' Association announced on Thursday night that it is setting up a breakaway championship.

Following a four-hour meeting at Renault's Enstone factory, the eight members of FOTA - Ferrari, McLaren, Renault, BMW Sauber, Toyota, Brawn, Red Bull Racing and Scuderia Toro Rosso - said they had grown frustrated with the FIA's stance against the organisation, and had no option but to create a series of their own.

"The teams cannot continue to compromise on the fundamental values of the sport and have declined to alter their original conditional entries to the 2010 World Championship," said a statement issued by FOTA after the meeting.

"These teams therefore have no alternative other than to commence the preparation for a new Championship which reflects the values of its participants and partners. This series will have transparent governance, one set of regulations, encourage more entrants and listen to the wishes of the fans, including offering lower prices for spectators worldwide, partners and other important stakeholders.

"The major drivers, stars, brands, sponsors, promoters and companies historically associated with the highest level of motorsport will all feature in this new series."

F1 teams were given until Friday evening to remove the conditions attached to the provisional entries they posted earlier this month, or risk being left off the grid in 2010.

FIA president Max Mosley wrote to the teams yesterday offering them some of the concessions that they wanted to see regarding governance of the sport, but made it clear that he was sticking to plans for the introduction of a budget cap.

In his letter, Mosley also urged the teams to sign up to the championship before sorting out the final version of the regulations and a redrafted Concorde Agreement.

In response to that letter, the teams met at Renault's Enstone headquarters on Thursday evening for lengthy talks, where they finally decided that there was no way a compromise deal could be reached with the FIA.

The teams expressed frustration that their efforts to try and improve F1 had been rebuffed by the governing body and the sport's commercial rights holder.

"Since the formation of FOTA last September the teams have worked together and sought to engage the FIA and commercial rights holder, to develop and improve the sport," said the statement.

"Unprecedented worldwide financial turmoil has inevitably placed great challenges before the F1 community. FOTA is proud that it has achieved the most substantial measures to reduce costs in the history of our sport.

"In particular the manufacturer teams have provided assistance to the independent teams, a number of which would probably not be in the sport today without the FOTA initiatives. The FOTA teams have further agreed upon a substantial voluntary cost reduction that provides a sustainable model for the future.

"Following these efforts all the teams have confirmed to the FIA and the commercial rights holder that they are willing to commit until the end of 2012.

"The FIA and the commercial rights holder have campaigned to divide FOTA.

"The wishes of the majority of the teams are ignored. Furthermore, tens of millions of dollars have been withheld from many teams by the commercial rights holder, going back as far as 2006. Despite this and the uncompromising environment, FOTA has genuinely sought compromise."

The announcement by FOTA looks certain to overshadow the British Grand Prix, which takes place at Silverstone for the final time this weekend and which Mosley is expected to attend tomorrow.

With FOTA's stance now seemingly leaving no room for a deal possible, it's likely that more new teams will be added to the FIA's 2010 Formula 1 entry list.

The inclusion of Ferrari, Red Bull Racing and Scuderia Toro Rosso on that roster remains open to debate, however, with the FIA claiming that the teams committed themselves to F1 in a deal agreed several years ago.

Source: Autosport


Quote:
Ecclestone urged to broker peace deal

By Jonathan Noble Friday, June 19th 2009, 10:01 GMT

Formula 1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone has been urged to step forward and broker a peace deal between teams and the FIA to head off the threat of a breakaway championship.

The eight members of the Formula One Teams' Association (FOTA) sent shockwaves through F1 on Thursday night when they announced that they were setting up a rival championship for next year.

With fears that the breakaway could prove damaging, just as American racing suffered when Champ Car and the Indy Racing League split, former world champion Jackie Stewart believes that Ecclestone must play a part in sorting the situation out.

"The biggest player now that may have to be involved in this is Bernie, because after all he has the commercial rights," said Stewart.

"I am sure he does not want a breakaway group, because then that would seriously threaten [F1 owners] CVC and the Bernie Ecclestone package.

"Bernie knows how to do things, he has been very successful in F1 and the sport has been successful with much of what he has done. So he will be playing a fairly big role within the next two or three days.

"But frankly now the teams have made their decision and I don't think they will necessarily have to talk to the FIA at all this weekend. I think they should just get on with the British GP because it is one of the biggest events in the calendar.

"It is very important for the leaders of the world championship to consolidate their position and I believe they should not even bother to talk until Monday or Tuesday."

Ecclestone's role in events is being seen as crucial now, with sources close to FOTA suggesting that the body would not be averse to him playing a role in its new championship.

The man himself was keeping tight-lipped about the situation on Friday morning, however, ducking questions from the media about the situation.

"You'll have to ask Max about it," said Ecclestone about the breakaway plans. "For me, this situation is just back to the future."

Stewart believes that teams' frustrations at the way F1 has been run was the spur for making the bold step to set up their own series.

"I think it's been coming for some time," said Stewart, who has been a long-term critic of the FIA. "I think the teams feel that they have been bullied in some way for quite a long time, trying to force things through.

"I've said for a long time that the FIA needs to be restructured and there needs to be more corporate governance. If that had taken place we would not be in the position we're in at the present time.

"The constant change of the values of what has been suggested, with Max saying first of all £30 million [for a budget cap], then £40 million, then £40 million and we won't put engines or motorhomes in that, it is constantly changing the goalposts. I don't think you can do that in a sport that is the largest capital investment sport in the world."

There are now suggestions that the only way a breakaway can be averted is if FIA president Max Mosley sees through with his plans to step down from his current role when his term ends in October.

An announcement on his intentions could be made as early as next week, with the World Motor Sport Council meeting on Wednesday.

Stewart has no doubts that teams want Mosley's reign of running the sport to come to an end.

"I think they do want Max to go because I think frankly some of the decisions made over the year have been very questionable... I think a lot of people are kind of fed up with the dictatorial attitude."

He added: "I think right now the teams don't have to do anything. They just have to decide how they are going to do what they have said they are going to do, but I think from their point of view it seems that they have made that decision. I think it is now up to the FIA to perhaps come with a totally different proposal."

Source: Autosport


So what do we think about all this?

Personally, I would be interested in a new series. After what happened in both 2007 and 2008 I´m kinda done with the FIA. And the way they´ve been acting the last couple of months has been very hostile. When FOTA made suggestions about the TV package or points the FIA just threw the plans away and didn´t even listen. Then Bernie created a new points system (which was just crazy) and the FIA quickly tried to introduce it. Then who´s running F1, is it the FIA, is it Mosley himself or is it the commercial rights holder.

A new fresh series would be a good start. I´m sure the teams would stop going to the Middle-East. There´s nobody out there and its a fact that the teams want to return to North America, where they sell cars. All the circuits Ecclestone threw off the calendar because he was overcharging them could come back. I think they would also listen to fans because without fans there isn´t going to be a series.

Only problem I see is the competitive nature of all teams. Can they keep peace between them. Plus can they reduce enough costs. New teams surely want to enter F1 in 2010 if they keep the budget cap rules. But can the same be said about the new series?

Also isn´t Briatore part owner of GP2, they could move along with the new series too. It will be very interesting to see to which series young drivers want to go, F1 or FOTA F1. Same goes for the general fans that don´t watch any other motorsport. They will have to choose between watching F1 or watching that series with Ferrari and McLaren in it.

Also I hope they will continue with it and not just use it as a threat.

Please discuss and vote in the poll.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 3:40 pm 
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yeah will be interesting to see what happens, but at least one of the 2 will fold within a matter of years:(
Im hoping for some serious going-back from both sides, to get this sorted out.
There can only be 1 :(

End of the day in short term at least ill be going with the FOTA series, names, and manufacturer's and teams.


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 19, 2009 7:17 pm 
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The teams don't really say me anything. Okay there's Ferrari (1950) and McLaren (taken over by Ron in 1980). But all the other teams have just recently joined. Actually those new names that were earlier announced but then not included on the entry list (Prodrive, Lola, etc) said more to me then lets say a Renault or Toyota. Shame they were not included because they remind me of outfits like Brabham or Lotus. Much better then the big corporate teams.

If they create a new series I think they can keep it going for quite a while. The car manufacturers, although in trouble with the crisis, have loads of money. Same could be said about the mighty FIA.

I like how Mosley downplays this. Oh its not that bad, its just a threat. Begin 2010 they will turn around, oh they always do. Its just this kinda thing that people are fed up with. I thought the deadline was tonight. So if the teams won't enter then its a done deal. Now he's saying that early 2010 they will enter. Same with Max's statement about the British GP today. "I think it highly probable that it will be at Silverstone." One day its yes we're going to Donington, next day it is no I'm sure it will be at Silverstone. In the end British fans will just stay home. And who knows, maybe Bernie never had any intention on going to Donington Park. It wouldn't be the first time around. Its this behavior with deals, rules and money that splits the paddock.

Quote:
FIA to launch legal action against FOTA

By Pablo Elizalde Friday, June 19th 2009, 14:44 GMT

Motorsport's ruling body, the FIA, has announced it will be launching legal action against the Formula 1 teams trying to set up a breakaway championship.

The Formula One Teams' Association (FOTA) announced on Thursday night that, after failing to reach an agreement with the FIA, will start its own series next year.

But the governing body has responded to FOTA with a legal threat, saying the teams, and Ferrari in particular, have binding commitments that they cannot break.

The FIA also said that it will delay the publication of the 2010 entry list, expected tomorrow.

"The FIA's lawyers have now examined the FOTA threat to begin a breakaway series," said the FIA in a statement.

"The actions of FOTA as a whole, and Ferrari in particular, amount to serious violations of law including wilful interference with contractual relations, direct breaches of Ferrari's legal obligations and a grave violation of competition law.

"The FIA will be issuing legal proceedings without delay.

"Preparations for the 2010 FIA Formula One World Championship continue but publication of the final 2010 entry list will be put on hold while the FIA asserts its legal rights."

Source: Autosport


Quote:
Mosley believes split unlikely to happen

By Jonathan Noble Friday, June 19th 2009, 17:05 GMT

FIA president Max Mosley has dismissed the threat of a breakaway championship as 'posturing' by teams, and is confident a compromise settlement will be reached in time for the first race of 2010.

Following the bombshell announcement made by the eight members of the Formula One Teams' Association (FOTA) that they were commencing plans for a rival series, Mosley has made it clear that he is not too worried about the situation.

He believes that eventually the teams will soften their stance, and he thinks it highly unlikely that they will be able to afford to set up a second F1 series.

"I don't take it as seriously as some people do because I know that it is all posturing and posing," Mosley explained in a lengthy interview with the BBC on Friday. "It will all stop sometime between the beginning of 2010 and March 2010, the first race. All this will stop, it will all settle down and everyone will go racing."

When asked if he was totally sure there would be a solution that headed off the possibility of two championships, Mosley said: "Absolutely. I am completely confident because in the end people do what it is in their interests to do.

"It is in the interests of the teams to be in the F1 world championship and there is actually no fundamental or important issue that is stopping them taking part. It is all about personalities and power and who can grab what from whom, which is easy when nothing is at stake but when it gets to the first race and it is make your mind up time, they will be there."

Despite the hardline stance adopted by FOTA, Mosley believes that there is little chance of the breakaway reaching fruition - and said it was easy for teams to talk up their plans at this stage of the year.

"They can be very hard at the moment because it doesn't actually come to anything until March 2010," he explained. "So we are nine months away. Everybody can posture and pose, but we all know that when it gets to Melbourne 2010 there will be a F1 world championship and everyone who can be in it will be in it."

He added: "Always with these things there is a compromise because they cannot afford not to run in the F1 world championship, and we would be very reluctant to have a Formula 1 world championship without them, and I am talking about the eight teams there.

"I think some of them will disappear because some of the manufacturers will look at the amount of money being spent, the measures they are having to take within their companies, the people being laid off and accepting government money to keep going, and they are going to find it very difficult to keep pumping hundreds of millions into F1.

"So I think we will lose one or two or maybe three manufacturer teams, so we will need new teams to make up the space. But the great traditional teams, and I would include Ferrari in that, they need to be there and they will be there for sure. It will get sorted out."

Source: Autosport


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 1:46 pm 
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Quote:
Mosley: Peace agreed in Formula 1

By Steven English Wednesday, June 24th 2009, 11:49 GMT

FIA president Max Mosley has said he will not stand for re-election after claiming an agreement has been reached with Formula 1 teams to avoid a breakaway series.

According to sources, Mosley, F1 rights holder Bernie Ecclestone and Formula One Teams' Association [FOTA] chairman Luca di Montezemolo held a series of meetings overnight and into this morning, prior to today's World Motor Sport Council meeting in Paris, aimed at resolving the crisis.

As part of the deal, Mosley has agreed not to stand again as president of the governing body, despite earlier this week stating that he felt compelled to do so as long as the threat of a breakaway championship remained.

AUTOSPORT understands that as part of the agreement the teams must call off the breakaway series and sign up to a new Concorde Agreement until 2012.

"There will be no split," said Mosley. "We have agreed to a reduction of costs. There will be one F1 championship but the objective is to get back to the spending levels of the early 1990s within two years."

The FIA is expected to announce the official entry list for the 2010 Formula 1 World Championship later this afternoon.

Source: Autosport


Big question to me is if the original budget cap is still in place. Shame though, I liked to see what FOTA would have done with the F1 concept in a new series.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 24, 2009 4:53 pm 
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More info. Still pretty vague about the cost-cutting regulations.

The deal between the FIA and FOTA was confirmed on Wednesday afternoon, when the FIA announced that its planned budget cap for 2010 had been scrapped, and instead FOTA-proposed cost-cutting regulations will be introduced.

In a bid to help new teams, technical assistance will be offered to Campos Meta, Manor Grand Prix and Team US F1 by major outfits.

The FIA statement said: "As part of this agreement, the teams will, within two years, reduce the costs of competing in the championship to the level of the early 1990s.

"The manufacturer teams have agreed to assist the new entries for 2010 by providing technical assistance."

Furthermore, with it clear that FOTA is not trying to usurp the FIA's authority, FIA president Max Mosley has agreed to not stand for re-election in October.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 25, 2009 11:33 pm 
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And the saga continues.

Quote:
Mosley rethinks future over FOTA claims

By Jonathan Noble and Dieter Rencken Thursday, June 25th 2009, 20:41 GMT

Formula 1's future has been thrown into turmoil once again, with FIA president Max Mosley saying he is now keeping his future options open because of what he has called 'deliberate attempts' by teams to mislead the media.

Just 24 hours after Mosley reached a deal with FOTA to end the threat of a breakaway series, he has reacted angrily to what he calls 'false claims' made by the Formula One Teams' Association (FOTA) about the nature of their agreement.

In a letter that Mosley sent to FOTA chairman Luca di Montezemolo, which first appeared on website www.racefax.com but has now been seen by AUTOSPORT, Mosley makes it clear that he is angry at how FOTA has presented the terms of its deal.

And such is his seriousness with which he is treating the matter, that he has told FOTA that his original plan to step down as FIA president in October is no longer definite.

"Given your and FOTA's deliberate attempt to mislead the media, I now consider my options open," wrote Mosley in the letter. "At least until October, I am president of the FIA with the full authority of that office.

"After that it is the FIA member clubs, not you or FOTA, who will decide on the future leadership of the FIA."

Mosley is furious that FOTA representatives have claimed that FIA Senate president Michel Boeri is now in change of F1, that he himself was forced out of office and that he would have no role in the FIA once he steps down in October.

"We made a deal yesterday in Paris to end the recent difficulties in Formula 1," explained Mosley. "A fundamental part of this was that we would both present a positive and truthful account to the media.

"I was therefore astonished to learn that FOTA has been briefing the press that Mr Boeri has taken charge of Formula 1, something which you know is completely untrue; that I had been forced out of office, also false; and, apparently, that I would have no role in the FIA after October, something which is plain nonsense, if only because of the FIA statutes.

"Furthermore, you have suggested to the media that I was a 'dictator', an accusation which is grossly insulting to the 26 members of the World Motor Sport Council who have discussed and voted all the rules and procedures of Formula 1 since the 1980s, not to mention the representatives of the FIA's 122 countries who have democratically endorsed everything I and my World Motor Sport Council colleagues have done during the last 18 years."

The letter makes it clear that unless FOTA moves to address his complaints, then the deal that was agreed on Wednesday could collapse. The letter was sent prior to Thursday's FOTA press conference in Bologna, where Mosley had hoped an apology would be made - something which was not forthcoming.

Mosley said: "If you wish the agreement we made to have any chance of survival, you and FOTA must immediately rectify your actions. You must correct the false statements which have been made and make no further such statements.

"You yourself must issue a suitable correction and apology at your press conference this afternoon.

"Formula 1 is run entirely by our 25-strong team without any help from me or any other outsider. There was no need for me to involve myself further in Formula 1 once we had a settlement. Equally, I had a long-standing plan not to seek re-election in October. It was therefore possible for me to confirm both points to you yesterday."

Source: Autosport


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 08, 2009 9:57 pm 
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Not yet over.

So they create a meeting to discuss the rules and then say you can't vote because your not yet on the list. That makes sense. This is all becoming really childish and I'm sure they're losing lots of fans right now.

Quote:
FOTA Statement

Representatives of all FOTA teams attended a meeting of the Sporting Working Group at the Nürburgring today.

During the course of this meeting, the team managers were informed by Mr Charlie Whiting of the FIA that, contrary to previous agreements, the eight FOTA teams are not currently entered into the 2010 FIA Formula One World Championship and have no voting rights in relation to the technical and sporting regulations thereof.

It will be remembered that all eight active FOTA members were included on the "accepted" entry list as endorsed by the FIA World Motor Sport Council (WMSC) and communicated by FIA press statement on June 24.

In light of these claims, the FOTA representatives requested a postponement of today's meetings. This was rejected on the grounds that no new Concorde Agreement would be permitted before a unanimous approval of the 2010 regulations was achieved.

However, it is clear to the FOTA teams that the basis of the 2010 technical and sporting regulations was already established in Paris.

As endorsed by the WMSC and clearly stated in the FIA press statement of 24 June "the rules for 2010 onwards will be the 2009 regulations as well as further regulations agreed prior to 29 April 2009". At no point in the Paris discussions was any requirement for unanimous agreement on regulations change expressed. To subsequently go against the will of the WMSC and the detail of the Paris agreement puts the future of Formula 1 in jeopardy.

As a result of these statements, the FOTA representatives at the subsequent Technical Working Group were not able to exercise their rights and therefore had no option other than to terminate their participation.

The FOTA members undertook the Paris agreement and the subsequent discussions in good faith and with a desire to engage with all new and existing teams on the future of Formula One.'

Source: F1 Racing


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